Cinnamon Sticks and Fortunetelling: Stove-Brewed Coffee

misssk Eat local, Handmade, Herbs, How-to technique, Kitchen, Scratch cooking, Spirituality Leave a Comment

A couple of years ago, my dad took my sister and I out for Turkish coffee in Houston. We happily sipped tiny mugs of the thick, foamy, potent brew all the way down to the bottom, where a layer of thick dregs stuck to the cup. “Now flip it over onto your saucer, quick,” my dad instructed, demonstrating with a …

Simple Wonders of a Wooden Spoon

misssk Handmade, Kitchen, Kitchen tools, Scratch cooking Leave a Comment

You’d be hard pressed to find a chef without a collection of wooden spoons. Big, small, light, dark, worn, warped—they’re a kitchen essential that can last for decades and sometimes woo emotional attachments in the process. As a matter of fact, they were called “lovespoons” in Welsh tradition and given as affectionate gifts. There’s a ton of reasons why wooden …

Roasted Romance: Pan-Charred Tomatoes

misssk Handmade, How-to technique, Kitchen, Scratch cooking, Vegan, Veggie Leave a Comment

On Monday, we talked about the lovely, swoon-inducing roasted tomato, and how to make its traditional oven-browned incarnation. Today we’ll look at its less-popular (but no less seductive) cousin, which is rotated over high heat to give it all of the same caramelized goodness, with a distinct char and much more retained liquid, ideal for roasted salsas or sauces and …

Roasted Romance: Tomatoes in the Oven

misssk Handmade, How-to technique, Kitchen, Scratch cooking, Vegan, Veggie Leave a Comment

Might there be a method more romantic than the roast? Slow, sweet, deep and intense; roasting seems to bring out the inner charm of any protein or vegetable. I’m especially a fan of roasted tomatoes. Now that the season is winding to a close, you’ll find that treating your tomatoes with a little dry heat is a fantastic way to …

Meet the Molcajete

misssk Handmade, Kitchen, Kitchen tools, Mesoamerican, Scratch cooking Leave a Comment

Back in the day, before we had electric beaters and electric grinders and electric blenders and, well, electric anything, folks did things by hand. The molcajete, or Mesoamerican version of the mortar-and-pestle, dates back as many as 6,000 years (Delgado), long used in Aztec, Mayan and Mexican cuisines to grind chiles and spices and mash softer produce. Its name comes …